Category Archives: Links

This is what an insurgent looks like

This is happening one state away from me:

insurgent

Pretty scary stuff. I guess at least Americans are bearing arms to overthrow (in their mind) tyrannical government not just shooting at each other out of fear, anger or greed. It shows some holes in many citizens’ view of the social contract though.

As we sunset foursquare APIv1 and announce some amazing new milestones for APIv2, now seemed like as good a time as any to reflect on some of the decisions we made in APIv2 and see how they’re holding up. Fortunately, we were able to draw on both our experience with APIv1 and from tight iteration with our client developers (especially Anoop, who is awesome!). We’re pretty happy with the result, but we still made a few mistakes. Hopefully there are some lessons for anybody else out there who gets stuck designing an API.

via APIv2: Woulda, coulda, shoulda | Foursquare Engineering Blog.

Donna Dubinsky struggled to get individual health insurance (NYTimes)

The new health care reform legislation is not perfect. Nothing that complex could be. But I have no doubt that the system is broken and reform is absolutely essential. If we are not going to have universal coverage but are going to rely on employer plans, then we must offer individuals, self-employed people and small businesses a place to purchase insurance at a reasonable price.

via Money Won’t Buy You Health Insurance – NYTimes.com.

This is ultimately my big problem with the healthcare situation in the US. I’m sorry that poor people don’t have access to healthcare, but they don’t have access to healthcare in much of the world. The fact that successful, wealthy people don’t have access to affordable healthcare is ridiculous and unusual.

Looking for a present for your Valentine?

This item is one of the more disturbing objects in Henry Wellcome’s collection. A ‘Scold’s bridle’ is a fearsome looking mask which fits tightly on to the head. A scold was defined as a “rude, clamorous woman”. The bridle was used as a punishment for women considered to be spending too much time gossiping or quarrelling. Time spent in the bridle was normally allocated as a punishment by a local magistrate. The custom developed in Britain in the 1500s, and spread to some other European countries, including Germany. When wearing the mask it was impossible to speak. This example has a bell on top to draw even more attention to the wearer, increasing their humiliation. It was used until the early 1800s as a punishment in workhouses.

via Scold’s bridle, Germany, 1550-1800.

The Julie Project – moving story of a mother, drug addict and AIDS sufferer

Julie

I first met Julie on February 28, 1993. Julie, 18, stood in the lobby of the Ambassador Hotel, barefoot, pants unzipped, and an 8 day-old infant in her arms. She lived in San Francisco’s SRO district, a neighborhood of soup kitchens and cheap rooms. Her room was piled with clothes, overfull ashtrays and trash. She lived with Jack, father of her first baby Rachael, and who had given her AIDS. She left him months later to stop using drugs.

via Darcy Padilla | The Julie Project.